End Rape on Campus Launches It’s Speakers Bureau, a Lineup of Activists Working with Communities on Healing and Prevention

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End Rape on Campus Launches It’s Speakers Bureau, a Lineup of Activists Working with Communities on Healing and Prevention

End Rape on Campus (EROC) has launched its Speakers Bureau, a new program that will shape the movement to end sexual violence. The EROC Speakers Bureau provides transformational and intersectional programming to college and high school students, school professors and administrators, community organizations, businesses, and groups interested in ending sexual violence. 

The first 6-8 weeks of school is the time when students are most likely to be sexually assaulted. Fifty percent of sexual assaults at schools happen between August and November. This groundbreaking program radically shifts the response to this violence. The EROC Speakers Bureau assembles innovative grassroots activists from anti-violence movements in order to train, educate, and inspire a new generation of leaders in the fight to end sexual violence. The flagship lineup of speakers includes Veronica Agard, Fabiana Diaz, Cheyenne Tyler Jacobs, Cindy Trinh, and Lara Witt. These activists offer workshops, trainings, and keynotes tailored to meet the needs of different communities and bring expertise in subject matter including Black feminist theory, pop culure and sexual violence, survivorship and immigration, and more.

“This is more than just one prevention 101 program at the beginning of a school year. We’re working with communities, with students, with schools, to tailor trainings that get at the heart of harm and healing in their spaces,” shares Michelle Carroll, EROC Associate Director of External Programming. “The speakers we’ve assembled empower communities to flip the switch and shed light on what prevention, survivor support, and community healing look like. With this renewed intention and energy, this lineup of trainers and activists will power a movement to end sexual violence rooted in radical love while dismantling oppressive structures.”

Reinvigorating this movement with trainers that center community needs in their prevention and healing work is a new kind of resistance.